The double, une doublure, a doubler is ‘primary’ the lining of a garment, a second layer earlier in the same line and the use of tirer, to resemblance with a pencil, ‘deriving’ one, and drawing or pulling off apart (as one might a lining or a death mask). But a double is also an actor substituted (as an understudy, stand-in, stuntman, body-double). Joke Robaart.

As the double is at the same time a lead garment to research itself, and an understudy, this research arises from the interest in the slashing as a technique that has endure for centuries, and ends up being an excuse to discover what’s underneath those trashed garments, underwear and nudity through fashion behavior.

Renaissance was that beautiful period of explosion and research when the human being was pointed back as the center of creation, thought and moral; a turning point in European history between the Middle Ages and Modern history. From this convulsed context when arts, architecture, politics, science and literature emerged from and for human beings, inevitably, some changes went through people’s clothing too. That’s how, as a matter of magic, fantasy elements appeared into garments, leaving aside utility, difference and protection needs. What we nowadays denominate as street style and how trends ow from people niches to haute couture and nally are spread and dead into mainstream, this creation behavior may have started at that time when ornament and decor dug into population clothing, not only as a status sign. One of those elements was the slashing.

 

Beneath my slash

BIG SLASH AT OVERWEAR’S SLEEVE 1300
KÖHLER, CARL. A HISTORY OF COSTUME.

The slashing is a textile modification technique which strict definition involves making cuts in the outer fabric of a garment so it reveals the inner lining. Since on the late 13th century overdressed sleeves were worn really long and wide, they needed to cut a hole at some point to facilitate arm mobility. We assume this as a formal predecessor of slashing as an ornament, but there’s also a myth to which its expansion is attributed. It presumably happened when the Swiss army was coming back home from a defeat in France, while they were ransacking villages among the Burgundy, they cut up pieces of tends and banners and threaded theses scraps though the holes in their own garments. Upon arrival, wealthy people began to imitate such fashion for themselves.

Beginning with big identifiers cuts over the whole piece of the garment, especially the upper part of sleeves or at baggy pants, that also often created big volumes. However, over the years, they began to be smaller and smaller to create pattern shapes both all over, or on a particular piece of the garment that wanted to be highlighted. Secondly, a very contemporary quality of this technique in the Renaissance would be that it was used in both gender garments, menswear and womenswear, even in shoes.

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SLASHED SLEEVES 1544
AGNOLO BRONZINO, Eleonora of Toledo with her son Giovanni de Medici

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SLASHED CUFS, SHOULDERS AND BREAST 1526
HANS HOLBEIN THE YOUNG, Lais of corinth-holbein

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SLASHED VELVET SLIPPERS 1550-1574
UNKNOW

As a result of these researches through Renaissance clothing, several facts intrigued me: how underwear was showed at that time, how it was and how it evolved further till nowadays, how the fact of having or lacking a second clothing tier builds up a completely metaphor of the nude body, and lastly, how if we look around nowadays the slashing evolves until several shapes and samples showing that underwear and nudity are explicit on the streets and media.

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SLASHED PANTS AND BOOTS 2018
Y/PROYECT FEMME SS Collection

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BURNED TRASHED TEE MELT 2017
YASMINA GONIN Novembre X Écal

Fashion historian and curator, Valerie Steele, stands on her essay for A second skin. Exposed: a history of lingerie stands, during the Renaissance period, the undergarments of the ruling class that were shown were decorated, with lace collars and cuffs for men, and lavish stays and petticoats for women. However, during the 19th century, the standards of modestly became stricter, and so, overclothes became simpler, slashing was thrown away of decore and underwear was increasingly hidden. By the end of 17th century the development of European costume, in the true sense of the term, had attained it’s highest point. (Carl Köhler, A history of costume). It was a matter of balance, together with the fetish of underwear as a sight of neatness and intimacy, when the voluminous and ornamentation of clothing began to decrease, undergarments raised from the chemise and the double made of linen or cotton to be the realm of clothing.

There is no finer, richer, more beautiful fabric than the skin of a pretty woman.(Anatole France, french poet, journalist and novelist 1844-1925). Underwear, since its delicate elaboration, has been a matter of fetish around the nude body, due to it being the first layer of clothing that touch the body. Berry Tschinkel inquires into nudity as one of the most recurring dream images, which is understood as something that may be being revealed too quickly.

Beneath my slash

UNDERGARMENTS 1919
UNKOWN

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FEMININE NUDITY 1862
JEAN-AUGUSTE-DOMINIQUE Le Bain Turc

At this point, my interest turned into how nowadays slashing has driven underwear and skin to be revealed, and so, the image of a nude body, how slashed garments have become a fetish, changing its primitive devote for shape to a metaphor of the naked body walking in our streets. For instance, trashed jeans are provably the most dressed garment in a quite big fragment of population.

Beneath my slash

TRASHED JEANS 2018
KYLIE JENNER Instagram profile

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TRASHED JEANS 2017
PIERRE-ANGE CARLOTTI for Replica magazine

To wander a bit more around it, I decided to create a poll to see how people do and wear slashed garments and send it to diverse friends:

Beneath my slash
Beneath my slash
Beneath my slash
Beneath my slash

thanks to @_aralia who personally provided me with this pic of her own slashed pants

Berlin based brand DUMITRASCU explained me via email that there’s no particular relationship between their garments and Renaissance besides the humanistic approach of the brand in all senses. There is only inspiration in the casting and scenographic areas that envolved them, where the slicing emerges due to functionality, decore and the intention to reveal elements as art itself in their garments.

 

Beneath my slash

TWO PIECES PANTS 2017
DUMITRASCU AW Collection

To exemplify it all, Sirloin emerges as the brand that embodies the most notable development in this perspective which is the appearance of underwear as outwear. Their statement of the brand dwells in the complete integration of underwear into the outwear collection. To this effect, they work with jerseys and knitwear, comfortable fabrics mostly used in underwear and different technical construction elements of them, and from this, both underwear and clothing merge together.

From my skin to your undergarments, a magic world arises beneath my slash.

Beneath my slash

UNDERWEAR OUTWEAR 2017 SIRLOIN
AW Collection

Fashion, Encyclopedia. Digging and slashing, online (http://www.fashionencyclopedia.com/fashion_ costume_culture/European-Culture-15th-Century/Dagging-and-Slashing.html)
Gardner, Laura. IN PARTS AND PIECES. How women appear #mycalvins. Vestoj online (http://ves- toj.com/in-parts-and-in-pieces/)
Köhler, Carl. A history of costume. Dover, 1963.
Morency, Christopher. Sirloin’s ‘Stupid Elegance’. Business of Fashion, (https://www.businessoffas- hion.com/articles/spotlight/sirloin-stupid-elegance-emerging-designer)
Robaart, Joke. Folders, suits, pockets, les, stocks. Valiz met Secession, 2003.
Steele, Valerie. A second skin. Exposed: a history of lingerie. Colleen Hill, 2014.
del Traje, Historial. Historia I: Clase Renacimiento, online (https://historiadeltraje.wordpress.com/tag/cuchilladas/) Wilson, Elisabeth. Notes on fashion as fetish, Vestöj online (http://vestoj.com/notes-on-fashion-as-fetish/) Aylmer, Olivia. When we dream about clothes. Vestöj online (http://vestoj.com/when-we-dream-about-clothes/)